From our journals: Striving for social justice and equity in higher education

By

Meghan Ensell

Introduction: Striving for social justice and equity in higher education

By: Irina Okhemtchouk, San Francisco State University; Caroline Turner, Professor Emeritus at MLFTC’s division of educational leadership and policy studies, Lincoln Professor of Ethics and Education at Arizona State University; Patrick Newell, California State University, Chico

Published in: Education Policy Analysis Archives, March 29, 2021

Through the introduction of the special issue, Striving for Social Justice and Equity in Higher Education, the editors aim to add to a continued discussion on ingrained institutional inequities that remain to shape the ways in which education occurs across the higher education landscape. They include manuscripts with the goal to capture the many layers within higher education encompassing research and discussions on policy and systems that impact administration, leadership, faculty and student experiences. Okhemtchouk, Turner and Newell say they hope that institutional leaders and policymakers will use the knowledge shared in this special issue to cultivate nurturing learning environments that include and value the talent and perspectives of those who have been systematically undervalued and marginalized.

On diversity, identity and socialization: Inequality of educational outcomes

By: Caroline Turner, Professor Emeritus at MLFTC’s division of educational leadership and policy studies, Lincoln Professor of Ethics and Education at Arizona State University

Published in: Education Policy Analysis Archives, March 29, 2021

In this essay, Turner shares her personal and professional background relative to diversity, identity, socialization and the inequality of educational outcomes. She then presents U.S. census and Chronicle of Higher Education data to provide a national context for the discussion to follow, including implications for policy. Her findings involve the underrepresentation of Latinx women as students and professors in higher education. Recommendations on how this underrepresentation, as well as other marginalized groups, in K–12 and postsecondary education are offered. 

More than learning English? The impact of university intensive English language program attendance on international student academic achievement 

By: Adam Thomas Clark, academic associate, MLFTC; Dianna Lippincott; Global Launch's assistant director of strategic innovation, MLFTC; Jeongeun Kim, assistant professor, MLFTC

Published in: Education Policy Analysis Archives, March 29, 2021

This study frames intensive English language programs in institutions of higher education as potential vehicles for social justice among marginalized international students. The authors examine the differences in academic achievement between international students who enter a university through an English proficiency test and those who pass through an IEP. The article raises issues of equity in terms of the lack of analysis in long-term outcomes for these types of programs compared to other interventions, the need for expansion of international student data collection by institutions of higher education, and overall transparency in pre-university programs.