Faculty accolades, August 2019


Steve Graham


Steve Graham
was named the winner of the 2019 E.L. Thorndike Career Achievement Award by the American Psychological Association. The Thorndike is among the most prestigious awards given to living educational psychologists for their career-long achievements and contributions to the field. The APA says Thorndike winners “... are recognized for research in the best tradition of educational psychology: original, scientific, empirically-based research that contributes significantly to knowledge, theory or practice in educational psychology.” APA made the announcement at their annual convention, which brought 12,000 APA members to Chicago earlier this month.

Graham is a Mary Emily Warner Professor of Education in the division of Leadership and Innovation at Arizona State University’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. He has studied how writing develops, how to teach it effectively, and how writing can be used to support reading and learning for more than three decades. Graham was also the winner of the 2018 Sylvia Scribner Award, presented by the American Educational Research Association to researchers whose work over the last decade represents a significant advancement in the understanding of learning and instruction. He is also an inductee of the Reading Hall of Fame, which comprises nationally and internationally prominent researchers recognized for extraordinary contributions to theory and research in the study of literacy acquisition.


J. Bryan Henderson


J. Bryan Henderson
will become an assistant editor of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, considered the top journal for science education research. Currently a member of the JRST editorial board, Henderson will take up his new duties in January, beginning a five-year appointment. He will be part of an editorial team that will spend 2020 reviewing submissions for inclusion in the 2021 publication year.

Henderson is a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation postdoctoral fellow for 2018–20. The research proposal that won the award for him, “Development of the Science Dialogue Heuristic: A Framework for Supporting Oral Argumentation,” explores how classroom implementation of a heuristic for classroom speaking and listening can improve the depth to which students express their thinking. This year, Henderson co-chairs the Science Teaching and Learning special interest group for the American Educational Research Association.

Henderson is an assistant professor of learning sciences at MLFTC; part of the faculty for the PhD in Learning, Literacies and Technologies; and a member of the interdisciplinary graduate faculty in the ASU School of Life Sciences. He holds multiple degrees in science and education, including bachelor’s degrees in physics, astronomy and philosophy (applied mathematics minor); master’s degrees in physics and education; and a Stanford PhD in science education with an emphasis in educational technology. His dissertation topic was, “Technology-Mediated Peer Learning: Exploring an emerging trend in science education with a new framework for differentiating classroom interventions.”


Bryan Henderson talks about how students learn science