What is the Next Education Workforce? What does it look like in action? Is your school ready to transition to a new model? ASU's Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College developed these resources to help your team, school or district answer those questions and build effective Next Education Workforce models. 

What is the Next Education Workforce?

To build the Next Education Workforce, MLFTC works with schools and other partners to 1) provide all students with deeper and personalized learning by building teams of educators with distributed expertise and 2) empower educators by developing new opportunities for role-based specialization and advancement.


The critical importance of the Next Education Workforce

Hear from MLFTC Dean Carole Basile about why Next Education Workforce models are critically important, especially today.



Elements of the Next Education Workforce

Learn about the key elements of Next Education Workforce models.

Elements of the Next Education Workforce


Elements briefs

Dive deeper into each of the big ideas highlighted in the Elements of the Next Education Workforce. Each brief asks two questions: “What does this element look like in action?” and “What evidence do we have that this element is associated with positive outcomes?”

Elements brief: Teams of educators with distributed expertise

Elements brief: Deeper and personalized learning

Elements brief: Specializations and advancement pathways


Readiness factors

In an effort to help teams, schools or districts self-assess their readiness to embark on this sort of work, we created this document to capture a common set of conditions that were present in places that are successfully moving toward Next Education Workforce models.

Are we ready for the Next Education Workforce?

Partner spotlights

Partner spotlights feature teams of educators building new school models anchored in the elements of the Next Education Workforce. Explore resources from a few of our partner schools below.



Partner spotlight: SPARK School

At SPARK School at Kyrene de las Manitas, 120 students in multi-aged grade bands (third through fifth grades) work with a core team of six educators: one teacher executive designer, two certified teachers and three teacher candidates. The prototype school-within-a-school was developed during a design process collaboratively led by the Kyrene School District and ASU’s MLFTC Design Initiatives. In the resources below, you’ll find out how they’re implementing a Next Education Workforce model, explore their schedule and see their learning space layout.

SPARK School: School profile

SPARK School: Spotlight on the schedule

Spark School: Learning space layout


The benefits of teaming

This clip features four educators from SPARK School. In it, they describe the impact of teaming with distributed expertise on both educators and students.


Deeper & personalized learning

Here, SPARK School educators share how SPARK School leverages teams of educators with distributed expertise in combination with an innovative learning space in order to deepen and personalize student learning.


Community experts in the classroom

As part of their preparation for a mock trial, students at SPARK School prepared interview questions for a community member who is an attorney. Hear from a teacher candidate about the value of having community members share their expertise with students.


Student-selected mindfulness time

Several times a week, for a 20-minute period, SPARK students engage in Student-Selected Mindfulness Time. In this clip, a fourth-grade SPARK student and an MLFTC teacher candidate describe the activities students engage in and how they make their choices.


More about SPARK School

Curious to know more about the SPARK School design process? See Kyrene: Designing a New School Model.

Learn more about SPARK School at Kyrene de las Manitas.


Partner spotlight: Whittier Elementary School

In Fall 2020, Whittier Elementary in Mesa, Arizona will create two team-based learning communities with 170 students in grades four through six. Each “house” will include 85 students and will be guided by an educator team comprising three certified teachers and two MLFTC teacher candidates. In the resources below, you’ll find out how they’re implementing a Next Education Workforce model and explore their schedule.

Whittier Elementary: School profile

Whittier Elementary: Spotlight on the schedule


Partner spotlight: Westwood High School

Two hundred 9th-grade students at Westwood High School in Mesa, Arizona are distributed across three Success Teams. Each team comprises three educators: an algebra teacher, a biology teacher and an English teacher — one of whom serves as a lead for the team. In the resources below, you’ll find out how they’re implementing a Next Education Workforce model and explore their schedule.

Westwood High School: Success Teams profile

Westwood High School Success Teams: Spotlight on the schedule

Elementary Instructional Blueprints

Elementary instructional blueprints suggest ways teams of educators with distributed expertise might deploy themselves to better deepen and personalize student learning.

Elementary instructional blueprint: An introduction

Elementary instructional blueprint: Team-based differentiated practice

Elementary instructional blueprint: Lessons with industry experts

Elementary instructional blueprint: Thematic learning rotation

Elementary instructional blueprint: Authentic assessment work time

Deeper & personalized learning

As educators, we know how challenging the transition to deeper and personalized learning can be. The resources below are intended 1) to help you understand the inextricable relationship between deeper and personalized learning and teams of educators with distributed expertise and 2) to point you to resources that will help you on your journey to deepen and personalize learning for your students.


How teams contribute to deeper & personalized learning

Hear from MLFTC Dean Carole Basile about the relationship between deeper & personalized learning and teams of educators with distributed expertise.



Curated resources

Exploring a new topic can be exciting. We want to help make sure your exploration is productive, with targeted searches from reliable sources. These lists, while not comprehensive, offer good resources for planning and implementing deeper and personalized learning.

Deeper learning resources

Personalized learning resources

Deeper and personalized learning resources for a virtual setting

Levels of student autonomy

Levels of student autonomy is a simple system that supports student independence and personalized learning. The resource below explains how you might implement this system in your learning space.

Levels of student autonomy