Global Learning Metrics - Nov. 10-11, 2016

Program

Event Contact

Silvia Aparicio

iteachells@asu.edu

Day 1: November 10, 2016

8–10 a.m.
Bouchon Ballroom

Welcome breakfast
Check in and registration

10–10:30 a.m.
Bouchon Ballroom

Introduction
Iveta Silova, Center for Advanced Studies in Global Education, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University

Welcome
Carole Basile, Dean, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University

Opening remarks
Mark Bray, The University of Hong Kong UNESCO Chair Professor in Comparative Education and Director of Comparative Education Research Centre; President, Comparative & International Education Society (2016-2017)

10:30 a.m. – noon
Bouchon Ballroom

Plenary keynote debate: Are global learning metrics desirable?

View a livestream of this session

Learning metrics of any sort are necessarily politicized, as they raise issues with clear philosophical, technical and policy dimensions. Unlike goals that seek to universalize access for education, for which consensus is strong, debates around learning are considerably more contested. The first session of the symposium will set the stage for the debate by focusing on the different actors and rationales behind the development of global learning metrics. Are global learning metrics desirable and why? What are the main political challenges and opportunities? Who should be in charge of the development of global learning metrics and who should pay for it? What role should nation-states, international agencies, NGOs, teacher unions, academics, and other actors play in coordinating efforts to develop global learning metrics?

Noon – 1:30 p.m.

Break for lunch

1:30-3 p.m. Parallel sessions
San Carlos

Measuring quality education & learning: Youth, rights, and citizenship

Chair and Discussant: Lesley Bartlett, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  1. (Mis)measuring civic and citizenship education (Jill Koyama, University of Arizona)
  2. Conceptualizing human rights education from below: The metrics of praxis (Monisha Bajaj, University of San Francisco)
  3. Indigenous youth and the metrics of social change (Elizabeth Sumida Huaman, Arizona State University)
Sonora

Challenges, uses, and abuses of international large scale assessment data

Chair and Discussant: Eric Hanushek, Stanford University

  1. Overselling the need for global learning metrics? A critique of Hanushek and debates over achievement test scores and national economic growth (Hikaru Komatsu & Jeremy Rappleye, Kyoto University)
  2. Means without ends: International large-scale assessments (ILSAs) and the need for ILSA literacy (Mariusz Galczynski, Florida International University)
  3. Speculative metrics? Speculative markets: The World Bank’s SABER and global educational policy markets (Kaine Osburn, Lake Zurich Community Unit School District 95)
Rio Verde

Global and local interpretations of learning metrics: Actors and institutions

Chair and Discussant: Karen Mundy, University of Toronto and Global Partnership for Education

  1. The “public” as a stakeholder: Investing in equity before assessment (Frank Adamson, Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE)
  2. Whose success? Whose assessment? (Gia Cromer, George Mason University, Schar School of Policy and Government)
  3. Citizenship learning through school participatory budgeting: The evaluation challenge (Daniel Schugurensky, Drew Brown, and Niels Piepgrass, Arizona State University)
Chaparral

Global and local interpretations of learning metrics: Actors and institutions

Chair and Discussant: Manuel Cardoso, UNICEF

  1. What happens with the exit exam in the Colombian successful schools? (Ana Zamora, Universidad de Los Andes)
  2. Assessing place-based inequality of digital literacy outcomes in relation to economic inequality and opportunity to learn (Anna Montana Cirell and Eric Ambroso, Arizona State University)
  3. School choice and an era of increasing accountability measures: Influences on stakeholders in Arizona’s mature education market (Amanda Potterton, Arizona State University)
Prescott

Workshop: Use of educational large-scale assessment data for research on equity and inequalities

Falk Brese, International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA)

International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) promotes capacity building and knowledge sharing to facilitate innovation and foster quality in education. IEA studies can be of particular interest because they collect a huge variety of background information that can be related to students’ achievement, knowledge, and attitudes. The primary objective of this workshop is to show how IEA study data can be used for research related to equity and inequalities in education. Based on IEA’s TIMSS and ICCS studies, we will (i) introduce participants to the general structure of IEA data, (ii) show access paths to data sources, technical documentation, analysis guides, and software tools, and (iii) explain the possible uses of data for researchers who focus on equity and inequalities. Practical examples will help participants to develop their own research questions that could be answered with the available data.

This session is limited to 20 participants. Please RSVP HERE to reserve your spot.

3–3:30 p.m.
Ballroom Foyer

Coffee break

3:30–5 p.m.
South Center Ballroom

Plenary keynote debate: Are global learning metrics feasible?

View a livestream of this session

Developing learning metrics is a complex and contested enterprise. It is one of the biggest political, pedagogical and technical challenges of contemporary educational systems. This plenary debate will focus on the feasibility of the development of global learning metrics, addressing the following questions: How can we measure and compare educational achievement and outcomes across diverse contexts and educational systems? Can global learning metrics capture educational outcomes beyond the basic numeracy and literacy skills? What balance can be sought between the assessment of basic numeracy and literacy skills and the measurement of learning related to informational technologies, citizenship, human rights, sustainability, aesthetics, morality, religion and/or spirituality? In other words, how can we measure what it often pronounced as “too difficult to measure” yet is at the core of teaching and learning?

5:30–8 p.m.
Ring Fountain
Welcome reception

Day 2: November 11, 2016

9–10:30 a.m.
South Center Ballroom

Plenary keynote debate: Can global learning metrics be pedagogically innovative?

View a livestream of this session

In the discussion of global learning metrics, the global data banks and the International Large-Scale Assessments (ILSAs) - so-called “big data” - have played a central role. While producing new information and important insights about educational systems and learning outcomes, the big data movement has serious limitations. How well is big data suited to help us make decisions about improving teaching and learning in schools and classrooms? Do global learning metrics actually allow for pedagogical innovation? Or do they narrow pedagogical practices? What are alternative assessment and measurement tools that could complement global efforts of increasing educational access and outcomes, as well as improving teaching and learning?

10:30–11 a.m.
Ballroom Foyer
Coffee break
11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Parallel sessions
San Carlos

Measuring quality education & learning: Early years and early reading

Chair and Discussant: Anna Katyn Chmielewski, OISE/University of Toronto

  1. Measurement of early reading under the SDGs (Amber Gove, Simon King, and Abbie Raikes, RTI International)
  2. Steps towards a national implementation of the early years evaluation in Uruguay: Actors and actions (Alma Yadhira Lopez, The Learning Bar Inc./ University of New Brunswick)
  3. Measuring quality instruction with a universal primary grade reading classroom observation system in early grade reading (Marcia Davidson and Christin McConnell, USAID)
Sonora

Global and local interpretations of learning metrics: Study abroad and international service-learning

Chair and Discussant: Aryn Baxter, Arizona State University

  1. A comparative study of the institutional policies on service learning in Australia, Canada, and the United States (Takehito Kamata, University of Minnesota)
  2. Student learning abroad: A meta-synthesis of 15 years of research (Paige E. Butler, Middlebury Institute of International Studies)
  3. Branch campus and national development: The case of Georgetown University in Qatar (Lubna Kayyali, Teachers College, Columbia University)
Rio Verde

Global and local interpretations of learning metrics: Global design, alliances, and opposition

Chair and Discussant: Radhika Gorur, Deakin University

  1. Global alliance to monitor learning: A technical solution in a right institutional framework (Dan Cloney, ACER and Brenda Tay-Lim, UNESCO Institute for Statistics)
  2. Making measures that matter: On the design of global learning metrics (Ralf St. Clair, University of Victoria)
  3. Incorporating opposition: Global learning metrics and the (im)possibility of decline (Julia Lerch and Patricia Bromley, Stanford University)
Chaparral

Global and local interpretations of learning metrics: Perspectives from post-socialist states

Chair and Discussant: Duishon Shamatov, Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Education

  1. Domesticating ILSA in Russia: Historical grievances, national values, scientific rationality and education modernization (Nelli Piattoeva and Galina Gurova, University of Tampere)
  2. Translating the new assessment policy from the center to the periphery: The case of Kazakhstan (Kairat Kurakbayev, Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Education, Kazakhstan; Liz Winter, University of Cambridge Faculty of Education, UK; and Daniel Torrano, Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Education, Kazakhstan)
  3. Teaching in and for the global knowledge economy: The challenge of competence-based education in post-communist Albania (Meg P. Gardinier, Florida International University)
Director’s Boardroom

Workshop: DIY Podcasting: Hands-on learning for beginners

Will Brehm

In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of podcasting from Will Brehm, the host of the weekly podcast, FreshEd. The workshop will focus on recording high-quality audio without a sound studio; the technical side of editing audio clips; and launching a podcast online. In addition to learning the technical side of podcasting, participants will have a discussion about putting together a FreshEd podcast episode based on the Symposium’s plenary sessions. This is an opportunity for participants not only to learn the basics of podcasts but also join FreshEd as contributors.

This session is limited to 10 participants. Please RSVP HERE to reserve your spot.

NOTE: participants are encouraged to bring their own computers, headphones, and USB microphones (if they have them).

12:30–2 p.m. Break for lunch
2–3:30 p.m. Parallel sessions
San Carlos

Measuring quality education & learning: Early grades reading

Chair and Discussant: Marcia Davidson, USAID

  1. Treasure what you measure: Reading with comprehension (Amy Jo Dowd, Save the Children; Lesley Bartlett, University of Wisconsin-Madison)
  2. Bridging the gap: Measuring disparities in reading skills (Manuel Cardoso, UNICEF)
  3. Rapid assessment of reading in Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) in India: Tasks, learnings, challenges and opportunities (Ketan Verma, ASER)
Sonora

Challenges, uses and abuses of international large scale assessment data: Methods

Chair and Discussant: Frank Adamson, Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE)

  1. The global increase in socioeconomic achievement gaps, 1964-2012: Methodological issues in monitoring inequalities in learning (Anna Katyn Chmielewski, OISE/University of Toronto)
  2. Using the measures of opportunity to learn (OTL) to understand the SES achievement gap across countries (Jeanne M. Powers and Margarita Pivovarova, Arizona State University)
  3. Are achievement gaps associated with attainment gaps between low and high socioeconomic students? Evidence from Brazil (Luana Marotta, Stanford University)
Rio Verde

Global and local interpretations of learning metrics: Marginalized youth

Chair and Discussant: Jill Koyama, University of Arizona

  1. The importance of assessing peer relationships: Evidence from marginalized youth in East Africa (Nancy Pellowski Wiger, University of Minnesota)
  2. Reimagining curriculum and assessment in an age of rapid urbanization: A longitudinal study of rural Chinese students (Jingjing Lou, Beloit College, Wisconsin)
  3. The pursuit of educational equity: Re-conceptualizing the role of cultural and linguistic heritage of Roma people (Veselina Lambrev, University of Hawaii at Manoa)
  4. Fracture, civilization or nationalism: The educated person in South Sudan (Sandra Schmidt, Teachers College, Columbia University)
Chaparral

Challenges, uses and abuses of international large scale assessment data: Actors and institutions

Chair and Discussant: Aaron Benavot, UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Report and University at Albany-SUNY

  1. International organizations as political actors in systems-changing technology reforms (Patricia Burch and Neha Miglani, University of Southern California)
  2. PISA, policymaking and pantomime (Bob Adamson, The Education University of Hong Kong)
  3. Political theater of global policies: International assessments as props (Elena (Helen) Aydarova, Arizona State University)
  4. Exploring national policymakers’ understanding and use of international large scale assessments in Kazakhstan (Jason Sparks, Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Education; David Rutkowski, Centre for Educational Measurement, University of Oslo; Duishon Shamatov, Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Education)
Prescott

Workshop: Exploring the educational value of films, podcasts, and social networks

Hugh McLean, Will Brehm, and Aryn Baxter

This session explores the ways in which education is represented in films, podcasts, and social networks as well as in the educational value of such mediums. The session brings together three speakers: Hugh McLean has been working on representations of education in film, spearheading the CIES film festival in 2015; Will Brehm has been hosting a podcast, FreshEd, that features educational researchers in weekly shows; and Aryn Baxter has been researching online social networking and learning platforms among students at African and North American universities. This session will be organized as an open discussion where participants converse on the pedagogical uses of films, podcasts, and social networks in classrooms as well as reflect on the ways in which education is represented in a comparative perspective. The ideas collected during this session will inform the future directions of the CIES film festival, FreshEd, and other innovative efforts to leverage media and technology for learning.

This session is limited to 20 participants. Please RSVP HERE to reserve your spot.

3:30–4 p.m. Coffee break
4–5:30 p.m.
South Center Ballroom

Plenary keynote debate: Can global learning metrics be culturally responsive?

View a livestream of this session

The concept of global learning metrics is based on the assumption that there is an agreement about what constitutes “good” and “quality” education worldwide. However, efforts to develop global learning metrics have often neglected the diversity of cultural contexts and educational systems. Is there a global core of fundamental knowledge, skills and competencies that are relevant across different countries? How can global learning metrics capture the dynamics of race, ethnicity, class, gender, religion, and other factors that contribute to students’ cultural identities? More broadly, how can global learning metrics be more culturally responsive and relevant in the context of uneven power dynamics globally?

5:30–6 p.m.
South Center Ballroom

Closing remarks

Maria Teresa Tatto, Arizona State University
Southwest Borderlands Professor of Comparative Education
Professor, Division of Educational Leadership and Innovation
Past-President, Comparative & International Education Society (2010-11)

Noah W. Sobe, Loyola University Chicago
Professor of Cultural and Educational Policy Studies;
Director, Center for Comparative Education;
President-Elect, Comparative & International Education Society (2016-17)