Founded on Excellence 

2012: Two years after being reorganized to include three Colleges of Education and expanding to serve all four campuses of Arizona State University, ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College is ranked as one of the nation’s highest-quality graduate programs in education.

2010: The College of Teacher Education and Leadership and The Mary Lou Fulton Institute and Graduate School of Education merged to impact education locally, nationally, and globally and were re-named The Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College.

2009: The Mary Lou Fulton Institute and Graduate College of Education was established.

2009: The College of Teacher Education and Leadership and the School of Education Innovation and Teacher Preparation are merged along with all of the teacher preparation programs at Tempe, encompassing all initial teacher certification (undergraduate and graduate). Already having programs on the Downtown Campus, CTEL now had programs on four campuses.

2006: The School of Education Innovation and Teacher Preparation was established at the Polytechnic Campus, and The College of Education at the Tempe Campus was renamed The Mary Lou Fulton College of Education.

1994: The College of Teacher Education and Leadership was established on the West Campus.

1958: The people of Arizona voted two-to-one on a state ballot proposition changing the name of the institution to Arizona State University. The College of Education was one of the four core colleges of the university.

1937: Arizona State Teachers College offered its first graduate degree, the Masters in Education.

1929:The name Tempe State Teachers College was changed to Arizona State Teachers College at Tempe.

1928: The Bachelor of Arts in Education was authorized. Students completing a four-year course were eligible for graduate work in education at a university, and would receive secondary certificates permitting them to teach in Arizona high schools. The requirement for diploma and grade school teaching certificates increased to a three-year curriculum.

1925: The Normal School, with 41 faculty members and 672 students, became the Tempe State Teachers College with the power to establish a four-year college curriculum offering a Bachelor of Education. A two-year curriculum was also offered, leading to a diploma to teach in Arizona elementary schools, and an additional two years earned a Bachelor of Education degree.

1886: Arizona State University was founded as a Normal School in the Territory of Arizona, the first institution of higher education in Arizona, and was established to train public school teachers and also teach “husbandry” (agriculture) and the mechanical arts.